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Planning summer travel ahead of Fourth of July | Business

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The Fourth of July has become one of the most popular times of year in the U.S. for traveling, but summer vacations may look different this year. COVID-19 cases are rising in Texas, causing many to re-evaluate their Fourth of July plans. Although state government has allowed most businesses to reopen and travel restrictions have expired, Texans are still wondering how they can stay safe on their holiday vacations.

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) reminds people that travel can increase the risk of getting sick and recommends vacationers stay close to home by traveling domestically. Destinations like parks and beaches offer outdoor fun for your family while allowing plenty of room to maintain a safe distance from other groups. Renting an RV can help you avoid air travel and staying in hotels, and outdoor fireworks shows can be enjoyed from a distance.

If your family is looking to get away this Fourth of July, use these travel tips from your Better Business Bureau:

  • Check local regulations. If you are traveling beyond Texas, see what travel regulations that state has in place. Some states are requiring travelers to isolate for 14 days upon arrival. Be sure to take face masks to wear in public places, as some states are continuing to require the use of cloth masks.
  • Call ahead. When visiting state parks, staying in hotels or viewing attractions, call ahead to see if the locations are open. Some places may be limiting guests, so check if there is space for your family. Check when you’re planning your trip and check again before you leave for vacation.
  • Consider travel insurance. For those who decide to travel by air, consider investing in travel insurance. In the event your flight is canceled, or you have to reschedule, travel insurance can keep you from losing money. Certain insurances may be required to rent or operate an RV.
  • Practice RV etiquette. If you’re traveling in an RV, disinfect all inside surfaces after picking it up and before returning from your trip. You should also book a spot in advance if you plan to park the vehicle at a U.S. national park. Remember, dumping wastewater is part of renting an RV and can be a messy process. See if your campsite offers dumping services or read the RV manual before attempting to do it yourself.

In this stressful time, vacations can be a welcome break from reality. It is important to continue protecting yourself and those around you from illness, even while traveling. For more tips on summer travels and RV rental, visit us at BBB.org.

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Travel

James Harden, Russell Westbrook don’t travel with Houston Rockets to Florida

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Houston Rockets stars James Harden and Russell Westbrook did not travel with the team to Florida and did not participate in the team’s first practice. Coach Mike D’Antoni didn’t provide a reason for their absence but said he expects both players to join the team at Disney World.

“I don’t think it’s going to be too many days,” D’Antoni said Saturday. “It will work itself out. Some things you can’t control totally, but in a few days, they’ll be here.”

D’Antoni was asked how much missing the team’s two biggest stars for the first few days of practice will hinder his club.

“It’s not ideal,” he said. “But it’s going to be good, and we’ll be ready to go. It won’t set us back.”

Houston’s first game back from the shutdown is July 31 against the Dallas Mavericks.

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Two Kings who tested positive for coronavirus travel to Orlando bubble

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What You Need To Know About Atlantic Canada’s New Coronavirus Travel Bubble

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Canada’s four maritime provinces recently introduced a new pandemic “travel bubble” rule. Designed to lift the spirits and the economy of the region, the bubble rule allows residents from Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island to travel freely between each of the four provinces without the need to quarantine for 14 days upon entry. Residents (as well as seasonal residents in some cases) will, however, be required to provide ID that proves they are a resident of an Atlantic province.

Before you travel, however, keep in mind that the rules are constantly changing, so it’s vital to check with the destination province for specific entry requirements before you travel. Furthermore, the government of Canada is still advising overall that people only travel for essential purposes if possible.

Prince Edward Island

Canadians from outside the Atlantic provinces continue to be banned from entry to PEI unless pre-approved as an essential worker, a seasonal resident (see below), for compassionate reasons, or to provide family support.

Travelers from other Atlantic provinces are permitted to enter but must fill out a special Travel Declaration Form available on the province’s website. Islanders returning from travel outside of Atlantic Canada (including other Canadian provinces) must self-isolate for 14 days before they will be permitted to travel to another Atlantic province.

If someone is a seasonal resident of PEI, they may enter the province but they first must apply for pre-travel approval and self-isolate for 14 days upon entry.

For more information, visit the province’s website.

Newfoundland and Labrador

In general, residents (even seasonal residents) outside of the Atlantic Bubble are not permitted to enter the province (though there is talk of lifting this requirement in the next couple of weeks so keep checking the website). Residents of Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island do not need to fill out any special travel form but they will be required to show ID when entering.

According to the website, the only other people allowed to enter the province are:

  • Asymptomatic workers and individuals who are subject to the Self-Isolation Exemption Order; and
  • Individuals who have been permitted entry to the province in extenuating circumstances, as approved in advance by the Chief Medical Officer of Health.

You may apply for an exemption by completing the Travel Restrictions Exemption Request Application.

Visit the website for more details.

Nova Scotia

Nova Scotia has the most relaxed travel rules presently of any Atlantic province. Canadian travelers from outside the Atlantic Bubble are allowed to enter the province but they must self-isolate for 14 days. However, if someone has already self-isolated in another Atlantic Canadian province, they can enter Nova Scotia without self-isolating again.

Residents of Atlantic Canada will still need to show ID when entering Nova Scotia. According to the website: “When Atlantic Canadians arrive in Nova Scotia, every adult needs to provide government-issued identification (like a Driver’s License or Health Card) or a utility bill or bank statement that shows their permanent home address. A self-declaration form isn’t required for Atlantic Canadians to enter Nova Scotia.”

Read more here.

New Brunswick

Travelers outside the Atlantic region are not allowed to enter New Brunswick unless they own property or are visiting immediate family members in the province. However, even if you fall within those exceptions, you will have to self-isolate for 14 days. Exceptions to isolation rules for essential workers, going to funerals and more, can be found here.

All visitors, even those from the Atlantic Canada, must provide proof of ID and register their travel. You can pre-register at the border or online (to save time) on the website.

Get more information on the website.

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